Grann chat

Green was sure that a mistake had been made, and hurried to Christie’s to inspect the materials.Upon his return, he told friends that he was certain that many of the papers were the same as those he had uncovered.From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z comes this “gripping” (The Miami Herald) and “hilarious” (EW) collection of real-life mysteries about people whose obsessions propel them into unfathomable and often deadly circumstances.Whether David Grann is investigating a mysterious murder, tracking a chameleon-like con artist, or hunting an elusive giant squid, he has proven to be one of the most gifted reporters and storytellers of his generation.There are higher bids on the table, including George Clooney directing and Amy Pascal producing, but the power of two Oscar-winners plus the director of one of the highest-grossing films of all time is too powerful of a package to decline.

For years, Green continued to sort through evidence and interview relatives, until one day the muddled trail led to London—and the doorstep of Jean Conan Doyle, the youngest of the author’s children.(Unlike Green, who moved between the two camps, many Doyleans distanced themselves from the Sherlockians, who often treated Holmes as if he were a real detective and refused to mention Conan Doyle by name.)Green shared with these scholars what he knew about the archive’s provenance, revealing what he considered the most damning piece of evidence: a copy of Dame Jean’s will, which stated, “I give to The British Library all . Toward the end of the month, as the group’s campaign intensified and its objections appeared in the press, Green hinted to his sister, Priscilla West, that someone was threatening him.Later, he sent her a cryptic note containing three phone numbers and the message “please keep these numbers safe.” He also called a reporter from the London Times, warning that “something” might happen to him.(Green had once been chairman.) He alerted other so-called Sherlockians, including various American members of the Baker Street Irregulars, an invitation-only group that was founded in 1934 and named after the street urchins Holmes regularly employed to ferret out information.Green also contacted the more orthodox scholars of Conan Doyle, or Doyleans, about the sale. my late father’s original papers, personal manuscripts, diaries, engagement books, and writings.” Determined to block the auction, the makeshift group of amateur sleuths presented its case to Members of Parliament.Peering inside them, he said, he had glimpsed part of the archive.

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